What Teenagers Can Teach You About Resume Writing

Resume WritingYes, you read that right! Teenagers can actually help you to understand the perspective of the average recruiter and the things that are desired by them in an effective resume. Professional resume writers are able to justify this requirement to some extent, but even they could benefit from the insights provided by a teenager. Understanding the “typical” teenage mind mentality is a huge advantage to writing your resume and elevator pitch.

Here are some traits of teens that could help you to refine your resume in ways that you probably never thought of before.

They Just Wont Read Your Resume

Hard to believe? Just hand them your resume and you will know that this point bears a lot more significance that you estimate. Even if you ask them to do basic tasks such as cleaning their rooms, they won’t do it unless compelled excessively. All of this makes them grumpy, irritated and a passive display of anger in the form of sighs or putting down objects with more force than normal.

What you need to understand from this behavioural aspect is that recruiters are rarely actually interested in reviewing the hundreds of resumes that pour in. They do it because it’s their job, and not because they are genuinely enjoying it. Just imagine what they go through on a daily basis, especially if recruitment drives are being carried out. Try to lessen their pain by making your resume interesting enough to gain their attention.

Teens Love Shortcuts

Teenagers are a master at breaking things down to the simplest components to get the job done with the least amount of effort but just enough to get the job done. They love shortcuts, and they might not be necessarily appealing. How does this relate to a recruiter? Well, for a start, they do not actually go through your resumes in a detailed manner. They have mastered the art of scanning documents for important keywords and relevant information, and based on this data, they decide on the worthiness of the applicant.

A few seconds is all that it takes for them to decide your career’s prospects with respect to the job that you have applied for. Make it easy for their skimming eyes to find the most important elements of your resume. Just answer two quintessential questions – “What do you want?” and “Why are you the best person for the job?” This should take care of things.

Having Negative Tendencies is Pretty Common

Most teens tend to like negativity. They also have a natural sarcastic nature that came out at every opportunity. My intention is not to generalize things and create a stereotypical perceptions of teenagers. But, most of them actually tend to be more negative than you would expect. Say for example, you throw a party and everything seems to be going nice, except for the one little thing that didn’t work out like it should have. Teens are going to hook onto this one particular thing and use that for winning an argument or simply proving their point.

Recruiters too have a similar approach when it comes to reviewing resumes. When someone is reading your resume they are going to fill in the information you do not provide. They will do so from this negative standpoint, often without even thinking about it. Do not make the mistake of assuming that the recruiter would be kind enough to consider the “missing” information or details that are not clear enough. when you prepare your resume, make sure that you do so with immense care and double check the resume to ensure that nothing is left out.

They Wont Take Your Word Blindly

Ever tried convincing a teenager? They will never believe anything blindly. You can try all you want but you can never get them to take you word without adequate proof. When they don’t heed to your advice, they usually land up in problems and expect that you help them out by solving the problem that you had tried your best to avoid in the first place.

Just because you mentioned about a particular skill in your resume doesn’t mean that the recruiter is going to take your word for it. You need to prove your worth with quantifiable and realistic achievements so that the recruiter is able to determine your capabilities from it. It is not feasible to expect them to believe everything you pen down. Just ask yourself if you would have done the same. I think you have got the answer to your queries.

It’s Never About You!

If you have spent some time around teenagers, you might have realized that it is never about what you want or what you wish to do. In order to engage them in a common activity, you need to make them see the value of the task and the importance that it holds for them. Then, and only then would they participate willingly. The same is applicable for recruiters. Write your resume for them, how you can solve their problems instead of what you are looking for in your next job.

You may have a myriad of desires with respect to your career path, but the same may not have relevance in the eyes of the recruiter. So make sure that you pen down the ways in which you would be able to contribute to their growth and development. Once that is taken care of, it should not be too difficult to focus on your own growth.

They Get Distracted Easily

The moment you go into lengthy descriptions or details, you will find that the average teenager has already lost interest in your story. If you hear the words “this is so boring” coming out of the mouths of teens, then you should know that you are doomed. The only way that you can keep them interested is to stick to the points and be as concise as possible.

When you prepare your resume, keep it straightforward, concise and highlight the important sections so that the resume grabs the interest of the reviewer within 5-10 seconds (average time for scanning a resume). Always give them a reason to keep reading.

Key Takeaways

Resumes are just meant to get you noticed by recruiters. Thousands of aspiring applicants, some freshers and some experienced, battle it out to secure the job of their dreams. It isn’t easy for anyone to get noticed and get the highly anticipated interview call. But difficult doesn’t equal impossible. With a little preparation and proper structuring of the resume, you can always increases the chances of being invited for an interview.

Here are the key takeaways from our discussion of how teens help in understanding the designs of an effective resume.

  • Try to make your resume interesting enough to gain their attention.
  • Just answer two quintessential questions – “What do you want?” and “Why are you the best person for the job?” This should take care of things.
  • Just because you mentioned about a particular skill in your resume doesn’t mean that the recruiter is going to take your word for it.
  • Do not make the mistake of assuming that the recruiter would be kind enough to consider the “missing” information or details that are not clear enough.
  • Write your resume for them, how you can solve their problems instead of what you are looking for in your next job.
  • Always give them a reason to keep reading.
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